Passion for Dutch Delftware


When Chinese porcelain was introduced in Europe around 1600 it ignited the production of ceramics in the Dutch city of Delft. Rapidly the most skilful Delft factories, such as De Grieksche A, De Paeuw or De Porceleyne Fles, led the production and decoration of Delft faience to such a degree of perfection that its success spread around the entire European continent and even back to China. (history).

Since 1881 and over five generations Aronson Antiquairs has shared the passion for Dutch Delftware with private collectors and museum and corporate curators around the world. The Aronson family members have strived to gain and maintain the confidence of its clientele to collect the finest Delftware available.

Robert Aronson, specialist in 17th and 18th century Dutch Delftware and a “master in Delft blue” (magazine Residence) has “some of the world’s most sought-after example of rare Dutch Delftware” (Artdaily.org). The Financial Times recently wrote that Delft at Aronson’s are “collectables to be discovered” and the Wall Street Journal calls them “exquisite antique examples” in their article “Delight in blue and white.

From our newsletter

The Delft potters were inspired by a seventeenth-century tradition. Each year the Butcher’s guild in Holland would hold a parade on the day of its patron saint (St. Luke, symbolized by the apocalyptic winged ox). The parade celebrated the guild’s best-bred bull or cow. The prized beast was decorated with floral garlands and ribbons, and gilded horns that were often topped with oranges. The festive, bannered procession was led by drummers and pipers, followed by a singing and dancing chorus of guild members and townspeople. Read more.

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“At Aronson of Amsterdam, there are brilliant examples of Dutch delftware …
(If you thought delft was all blue and white, you’re wrong.)”

 

– The New York Times.

 

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